What the Experts Expect for Investigative Journalism in 2019
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What the Experts Expect for Investigative Journalism in 2019

GIJN Staff |
January 15, 2019

With the backlash against democracy and anti-press sentiment growing, the need for investigations around issues such as corruption and climate change continues to rise.


With the backlash against democracy and anti-press sentiment growing, the need for investigations around issues such as corruption and climate change continues to rise. GIJN asked the leaders of our global community about what they see happening in investigative journalism around the world in 2019. Here’s what they told us:

Umar Cheema (Pakistan)

CO-FOUNDER, CENTER FOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING IN PAKISTAN

The fact that Pakistan is one of the most dangerous countries to practice journalism is no longer news. On average, three journalists have been killed there each year since the Committee to Protect Journalists started compiling the data in 1992. We were free to speak the truth at our own risks, but no more.

The editor of a top local publication has explained it like this: “They used to kill journalists; now, they’re up to kill journalism.” Who are “they?” Naming them isn’t without cost; it’s borne by the media houses employing such truth-tellers. The so-called democratic government has joined the forces of darkness. Regulations are being revised to reinforce control over the press.  Media houses are being pressured to fire critical journalists; others are losing jobs due to shrinking revenue. Social media is used to discredit the dissent.

Credit by - GIJN

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