When It Comes to Rape, Just Because a Case Is Cleared Doesn’t Mean It’s Solved
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When It Comes to Rape, Just Because a Case Is Cleared Doesn’t Mean It’s Solved

Bernice Yeung |
November 16, 2018

Some police departments, turning to a designation that’s supposed to be used sparingly, make it seem as though they’ve solved a significant number of rape cases when they have simply closed them.


This story was produced in collaboration with Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting and Newsy.

Andy Leisher didn’t like what he was seeing on the security cameras from his post at the front desk of the Ramada Inn in Janesville, Wisconsin. On the closed-circuit television in front of him, Leisher watched as a man in his 30s kissed what appeared to be a teenager in the motel hot tub.

It put him on alert. “It just felt awkward,” Leisher said of the scene. “She just seemed really young, and he seemed really old. Or too old to be with her.”

When Leisher, a part-time pastor, confirmed that the girl was 16, he called the police. A few hours later, police arrested 31-year-old Bryan Kind, and he was charged with having sex with a child and possession of child pornography. He’s pleaded not guilty.

After collecting Kind’s cellphones, Janesville police also found naked photos of a girl from Maryland, and they sent the information to authorities there.

It wasn’t news to the Baltimore County Police Department. About a month before the May 2017 arrest, the department closed its investigation into Kind on allegations that he had sex with a 13-year-old girl.

Credit by - Pro Publica

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